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The Three Horned King by Fragillimus335 The Three Horned King by Fragillimus335
Ceratopsipes is known only from a set of footprints, but they are exceptionally large. They are up to 80cm wide compared to Triceratops at 50cm. Although footprints can only give general estimates of size, these prints could indicate a ceratopsian of ~12 meters in length, and 15-20 tons in weight...thats pretty big!

Based largely on Pheaston's amazing Triceatops reconstruction.
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:iconron14:
Ron14 Featured By Owner Oct 5, 2017
Very impressive!
Also in response to some commenters here before me: it is likely that this is a very (VERY) large Triceratops. The tracks were found in the Laramie formation of Colorado. In the same formation plenty of remains of Triceratops and Torosaurus have been found, which makes it likely that this is one of those two. In fact the Laramie formation is, AFAIK, the oldest formation in which unambiguous Triceratops have been found, estimated at 68 million years old. Since the Ceratopsipes tracks are 1.3 -1.6 times 'average', my own guesstimate is that Ceratopsipes may indeed have been around 20 tonnes.

Eotriceratops is according to some researchers a separate genus, but according to others a species of Triceratops. It was found in the uppermost Horseshoe Canyon formation of Alberta, which is also estimated at 68 million years. So about the same age as Ceratopsipes. It is remarkable that it is considered very similar to and possibly congeneric with Ojoceratops of New Mexico (Naashoibito member of the Ojo Alamo formation, also about 68 million years). And some researchers consider Ojoceratops the same as (synonym of) Triceratops. The complete skull of Eotriceratops was some 3 meter long.

Another related giant is Triceratops maximus, named by Barnum Brown in 1933 (A GIGANTIC CERATOPSIAN DINOSAUR, TRICERATOPS MAXIMUS), AMNH 5040, pictured here on DeviantArt:
The maximum
T. maximus is from the Hell Creek formation of Montana, which is younger, probably around 66-67 million years. Therefore it is most probably a very large T. horridus. Since the preserved bones, in particular cervicals, are some 30-50% larger than 'average', the skull of this animal may also have been around 3 meter long (or even a bit more?).

Another site with nice art picturing T. maximus is here: www.luisrey.ndtilda.co.uk/html…
But remarkably it mentions a museum storage in Utah. I heard about this very big skull (about 2.7 meter or even larger).

I think what all this shows is that all through the Triceratops era there were exceptionally large individuals, as we see with many dinosaur species and genera (e.g. Edmontosaurus).
My own guesstimate is that these largest individuals of Triceratops/Ceratopsipes may have been around 20 tonnes.
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:iconfragillimus335:
Fragillimus335 Featured By Owner Oct 12, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
Yes, there were certainly some big Triceratops sp. or close relatives roaming around.  I'm doubting the 20 ton estimates for Ceratopsipes these days, the tracks are a bit distorted, and the animal probably slipped while making them.  I still think it was an above average ceratopsian, but I think the 2.7-3 meter skulls are probably representative of the biggest trikes that existed. So, maybe 9-10 meter 10-12 ton animals.
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:iconsilverdragon234:
SilverDragon234 Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2017
A solitary T. rex would excersize extreme caution when hunting these fortresses of venison.
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:iconfragillimus335:
Fragillimus335 Featured By Owner Jul 7, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
For sure!
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:iconsilverdragon234:
SilverDragon234 Featured By Owner Jul 7, 2017
:)
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:iconterizinosaurus:
Terizinosaurus Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2015
it is very fantastic!!!:D (Big Grin) 
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:iconraptor347:
raptor347 Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
oh. my. god...   GIANT CERATOPSIANS MAKE ME SO HAPPY!!! *dances around*
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:iconfragillimus335:
Fragillimus335 Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Yeah, it would have been an awe-inspiring animal!
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:iconriotgirlckb:
riotgirlckb Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
love the pattern in this one :D
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:iconfragillimus335:
Fragillimus335 Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks! I like it too!
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:iconriotgirlckb:
riotgirlckb Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
haha thats good :D welcome
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Sep 19, 2012
Nicely done!
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:iconelsqiubbonator:
ElSqiubbonator Featured By Owner Sep 19, 2012
So how do we know this was a new genus, and not a really big, old, Triceratops?
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:iconfragillimus335:
Fragillimus335 Featured By Owner Sep 19, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
We don't, but it would be quite a stretch for one adult Trike to be 4 times the weight of an average one.
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:icontarbosaurusbatar:
TarbosaurusBatar Featured By Owner Dec 1, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Well, something similar to that happened with Alamosaurus.
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:iconsameerprehistorica:
SameerPrehistorica Featured By Owner Sep 5, 2012  Hobbyist
Very nice.I didn't heard about this species before.I did heard about another ceratopsian which is bigger that is Eotriceratops.All i can say is...Triceratops is big enough for its species and also it can fight with any theropod one on one.So Eotriceratops or
Ceratopsipes is more dangerous for any theropod.If these ceratopsians are really that big,then the sauropods will be more enormous.
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:iconfragillimus335:
Fragillimus335 Featured By Owner Sep 5, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Yes, Ceratopsipes was more than a match for any theropod yet discovered.
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:iconsameerprehistorica:
SameerPrehistorica Featured By Owner Sep 5, 2012  Hobbyist
whatever it is..No land animal can stand a chance against a huge Sauropod :)
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:icontitanlizard:
titanlizard Featured By Owner Aug 31, 2012
Where and When lived it?
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:iconfragillimus335:
Fragillimus335 Featured By Owner Aug 31, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Western North America during the late Cretaceous period. ~80-65 million years ago.
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:icontitanlizard:
titanlizard Featured By Owner Aug 31, 2012
Thanks, its interesting. I creating a Dinosaur Revolution Fan-fic, and maybe Im going to do an episode with this :D
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:iconblakeravon100:
BlakeRavon100 Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2012
I like your style of drawing dinosaurs
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:iconfragillimus335:
Fragillimus335 Featured By Owner Aug 16, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks, I'm always looking to get better!
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